Standard 10

Standard Ten:

Governance and Administration

 

The institution has a governing board responsible for the quality and integrity of the institution. The institution has an administrative staff of appropriate size to enable the institution to achieve its goals and is organized to provide appropriate administrative administration, faculty, staff, and students, and facilitate effective communication among the institution�s constituencies.

 

A. Governing Board

 

A1 The governing board is an independent policy-making board
capable of reflecting the public interest in board activities and
decisions. It has a mechanism for providing for continuity
of board membership and staggered terms of office.

 

Descriptive Summary

The governing Board of Trustees is an independent policy-making board that reflects the public interest. Trustees take seriously the charge of accurately representing the community in board decisions. Board members participate in a variety of organizations and activities in their community and throughout the county enabling them to stay in touch with the interests and concerns of the community.

The Board of Trustees consists of five members elected at large from the district to

serve a term of four years. The terms are staggered, with three seats having been filled during this year�s election. The current trustees, with their length of service are as follows: Mr. Tom Elder, 10 years; Mr. Dennis Henderson, newly elected; Mr. Carl Tate, 9 years; Ms. Maxine Moore, 10 years; and Dr. Bettye Underhill, 4 years.

A student trustee, the Associated Student Body President, is elected annually by the students of Victor Valley College. The student trustee has an advisory vote on issues discussed in public session. Board meetings are held the second Tuesday of each month.

 

Self Evaluation

In its most recent self-evaluation, the board rated its performance on all parameters as being above average to excellent. This self-evaluation is designated as an annual tool.

The minutes of board meetings provide evidence of the ability of the board to reflect the public interest. The variety of backgrounds of the board members, along with their leadership experiences, provides for thorough discussions on issues facing the college.

Board members carefully consider and discuss matters presented on the agenda. They ask thoughtful questions about routine, as well as controversial, items.

The mechanism of staggered terms for board members is working well. Staggering terms provide continuity, as well as new perspectives as newer members with fresh ideas join experienced members. The governing board is elected in accordance with state laws and makes every effort to represent the public interest within the diverse elements of the population it represents.

 

Planning Agenda

None.

 

A2 The governing board ensures that the educational program is of high quality, is responsible for overseeing the financial health and integrity of the institution, and confirms that institutional practices are consistent with the board-approved institutional mission statement and policies.

 

Descriptive Summary

The Board is responsible for the financial and academic integrity of the institution, and confirms that educational programs and financial practices are consistent with institutional purposes and procedures. Historically, the Victor Valley College Strategic Plan1 has guided the Board and administration in educational and financial planning for the District. The institution has completed the Victor Valley Community College District Educational Master Plan: 1998-2005 And Beyond,2 which was developed by the departments of the institution. This document incorporates data from the Strategic Plan, Accreditation plans, mission, and goals of the District.

To ensure that the educational program is of high quality, the governing board relies primarily on the recommendations of the individual educational departments, Curriculum Committee, Faculty Senate, Academic and Vocational Deans, and the Vice President for Academic Services. Currently, the Board reviews summary reports of Curriculum Committee action and departmental Program Reviews on an annual basis, in addition to any presentation at a monthly board meeting regarding the educational program which may be brought to the Board through the Faculty Senate President, faculty, students, or members of the community. The Board reviews and gives final dispensation to faculty hiring and evaluation on a monthly basis. The Board will be provided the opportunity for enhanced analysis and discussion of the educational program with the re-instituted monthly Board informational/workshop meetings.

The Board provides substantive and timely oversight to the financial health and integrity of the institution. On a annual basis, the Board receives and reviews the preliminary and final budget documents which have been prepared collaboratively between the College Superintendent/President, Vice Presidents, and the College Assembly. Monthly, two members of the Board review every expense item for the District on a monthly basis; the full Board gives final review and approval to bid awards and district expenses. The Vice President for Fiscal and Administrative Services provides regular updates to the Board regarding the current state of district finances and pertinent activities and policies of governmental bodies at the local, state, and national level. An external audit of district finances is delivered to and evaluated by the Board annually. Acting upon a mandate of the Board, the District hired a permanent Internal Auditor to review and report upon fiscal processes, policies, and practices of the institution. Fiscal oversight will be enhanced also as a result of the re-instituted monthly Board informational/workshop meetings.

 

Self-Evaluation

An e-mail survey was conducted in the Fall of 1998 of College faculty, classified staff, managers, and administrators.3 College employees were first asked to respond to whether they agreed that "the governing board ensures that the educational program at Victor Valley College is of high quality." The survey was sent to 203 employees; however, only 51 employees replied. Responses were as follows: 18% strongly agreed, 22% moderately agreed, 18% slightly agreed, 2% slightly disagreed, 8% moderately disagreed, 29% strongly disagreed, and 4% had no opinion. Next, employees were asked to respond to whether they agreed that "the governing board gives adequate oversight to the financial health and integrity of the institution." Responses to this second statement were as follows: 16% strongly agreed, 22% moderately agreed, 8% slightly agreed, 4% slightly disagreed, 14% moderately disagreed, 33% strongly disagreed, and 4% had no opinion. Finally, college employees were asked to respond to whether they agreed that "the governing board confirms that institutional practices are consistent with the board approved institutional mission statement and policies." The responses to this last statement in the survey were as follows: 10% strongly agreed, 22% moderately agreed, 20% slightly agreed, 2% slightly disagreed, 10% moderately disagreed, 29% strongly disagreed, and 10% had no opinion.

 

Planning Agenda

1. The Board will help develop strategies for funding and implementation of the Educational Master Plan and provide for the annual review and update of the plan.

2. Board members will be encouraged to attend more college functions in order to improve communication and awareness between the Board and college community.

3. Explore the feasibility and demand for returning back to more comprehensive and detailed Program Review presentations to the Board.

4. Encourage more college staff attendance and participation at the monthly Board meetings.

5. Continue expansion of e-mail access and distribution to disseminate Board agendas, minutes, information, and reports in order to enhance staff awareness of Board actions.

6. The College will provide a process to include more segments of the College in the evaluation of the Board.

 

A3 The governing board establishes broad institutional policies and appropriately delegates responsibility to implement these policies. The governing board regularly evaluates its policies and practices and revises them as necessary.

 

Descriptive Summary

The responsibilities and functions of the Board of Trustees are specifically stated and defined in the Victor Valley Governance Agreement.4 In carrying out the responsibilities and functions defined specified by Assembly Bill 1725 (AB 1725), the Board of Trustees has full authority to adopt rules and regulations consistent with the regulations of the Board of Governors and the laws of the state that are necessary and proper to execute these prescribed functions.

The Board of Trustees has adopted broad constitutional policies and regulations delineating how policies are to be carried out, as contained in the Victor Valley College Board Policy Handbook.5 Global direction concerning the College is given by the Board of Trustees to the Superintendent/President. The Superintendent/President then delegates to the appropriate Vice President who in turn delegates to the appropriate Dean, Director, or other administrator the policies necessary to successfully implement the policy directives of the Board of Trustees. There is a clear differentiation between the policy-making function of the Board of Trustees and executive responsibilities.

The College Assembly is the shared governance group that reviews existing Board policies and formulates new policies. The policy is developed and the constituent representatives take the policy to their respective constituent group for feedback. The policy is read twice and documented in the College Assembly minutes. The Board of Trustees has two readings of the policy.

The Board of Trustees can initiate a policy and make recommendations that the administration formulate a policy. The Board policies are reviewed periodically by the administration. Copies of the policies are sent to the vice presidents for review and then sent back to the administration.

The Governing Board approved and adopted the Board of Trustees, Code of Ethics on December 14, 1993.6

 

Self Evaluation

During the December 2, 1998, Board of Trustees Workshop7 conducted by research consultant Cindra Smith, the Board of Trustees and College Administration discussed reviewing and revising the Board Policies.3 The Board of Trustees directed the Administration to review and revise the Board Policy Handbook. A Board of Trustees recommendation was to remove the procedures from the Board Policy Handbook and keep the policies intact.

At the December 2, 1998, Board of Trustees Workshop, discussion revolved around the following: teamwork, the handling of staff, community, and student grievances/complaints, trustee ethics, the Board of Trustees role in policy making, goal setting and planning, as well as what makes an effective Board of Trustees. Additionally, the role of the Board of Trustees and the role of the Superintendent/President were discussed, as well as Board of Trustee ethics, accountability to the community, and principals for effective policy making.

The Board of Trustees set goals for itself as a result of the December 2, 1998, workshop and anticipates another meeting to evaluate its progress at implementing the lessons learned from the workshop. The Superintendent/President suggested that quarterly meetings be held so that Board of Trustee members can continue to add to their expertise as Trustees.

The Board of Trustees establishes broad institutional policies and delegates responsibility for the implementation of these plans to the Superintendent/President. For example, the Board of Trustees has directed the Superintendent/President to provide for the security of District property. As a response to this Board of Trustees directive, the College has implemented a policy of purchasing computers equipped with lock-out keys to minimize theft.

Planning Agenda

1. The Administration will review and revise the Board Policy Handbook as directed by the Board of Trustees.

2. The Board policies will be accessible college-wide through Groupwise.

 

A4 In keeping with its mission, the governing board selects and evaluates the chief executive officer and confirms the appointment of other major academic and administrative officers.

 

Descriptive Summary

One of the major roles of the Board of Trustees is to select and evaluate the Superintendent/President. In addition, the Board of Trustees approves the hiring of all administrative and faculty positions. The current Superintendent/President, Nick Halisky, was hired by the Board of Trustees in June, 1995. The evaluation of the Superintendent/President is conducted by the Board of Trustees.

 

Self Evaluation

The Board of Trustees has adopted a policy8 for selection of the Superintendent/President and evaluates the Superintendent/President annually. The Board of Trustees confirms the appointment of all major academic and administrative officers. For example, since the last accreditation site visit, a new Vice President of Student Learning was hired in November, 1996. In addition, during the period July-August 1998, The Board of Trustees confirmed the appointments of three new Deans: Dean of Academic Programs, Dean of Vocational Programs, and Interim Dean of Student Services, as well as the newly created position of Internal Auditor.

Board of Trustees Clerk Thomas Elder conducted a random survey during the 1997-98 academic year to assess the performance of the Superintendent/President.9 This survey was placed in faculty and staff mailboxes for their evaluation. However, during this time period the contracts of a number of Deans were not renewed, and several surveys were completed by dissident employees, thus skewing the results of the survey.

 

Planning Agenda

1. The College will ask the Board of Trustees to institute another survey concerning the Superintendent/President.

 

A5 The size, duties, responsibilities, ethical conduct requirements, structure and operating procedures, and processes for assessing the performance of the governing board are clearly defined and published in board policies or by-laws. The board acts in a manner consistent with them.

 

Descriptive Summary

The Board Policies Handbook describes the size, structure, duties, responsibilities, operating procedures, and other policies related to the existence and operation of the Board of Trustees as follows:5

Board Policy 9311: States the procedure for the adoption, formation, and amendment of Board of Trustees policies.

Board Policy 9100: Outlines the organization of the Board of Trustees.

Board Policy 9120: Defines the Officers and Auxiliary Personnel.

Board Policy 9123: Defines the duties of the Assistant Secretary.

Board Policy 9110: States the number of members, and terms of office.

Board Policy 9200: States the responsibilities of members.

Board Policy 9220: Outlines the rights and responsibilities of the Student Trustee position.

Board Policy 9050: States the Code of Ethics for which all members of the Board of Trustees are responsible.

Board Policy 9111: Delineates procedures used for filling vacancies on the Board of Trustees.

Board Policy 9321: Describes the process for scheduling meetings, recognizing attending members of the public, special meetings, closed session procedures, and meeting adjournment.

Board Policy 9323: Describes the procedures (Parliamentary) of the Board of Trustees, and quorum requirements.

 

Self Evaluation

The Board of Trustees has a process to assess its own performance conducted by the Board members themselves. Elections of the individual members provide community feedback on the perceived performance of individual members, and the media can and often does provide day-to-day analysis of major decisions.

 

Planning Agenda

None.

 

A6 The governing board has a program for new member orientation and governing board development.

 

Descriptive Summary

The governing Board has an informational program for new member orientation and governing board development.

 

Self Evaluation

Currently, the governing Board does not have a formal orientation for new members. When a new trustee is elected to the Board of Trustees, the President of the Board of Trustees and the College President individually take the member to lunch and outline the procedures and policies of the Board of Trustees to that member. In addition, the new trustee attends a trustee orientation sponsored by the Community College League of California. Other Board of Trustees members can attend workshop orientations. For example, on December 2, 1998, Cindra Smith, a consultant, conducted an orientation for Board of Trustees members concerning duties and responsibilities for College Board of Trustee members. This orientation procedure is working adequately and no recommendations are made

 

Planning Agenda

None.

 

A7 The board is informed about and involved in the accreditation process.

 

Descriptive Summary

The Board of Trustees is informed and actively involved in the accreditation process. The Board of Trustees reviews and approves the interim and midterm reports. The President of the Board of Trustees is a member of the Accreditation Steering Team, and signs the Self Study Report prior to submission to the Accrediting Commission. The Superintendent/President provides the Board of Trustees with updates concerning the status of the Accreditation Self Study on a regular basis. In addition, the Board of Trustees meets with Accreditation Site Visit Team members to provide input and answer questions.

 

Self Evaluation

The Board of Trustees is informed about accreditation activities through the update reports given by the Superintendent/President, and has been actively involved in the Accreditation Self Study process. An example of trustee involvement was the active participation of Dr. Bettye Underhill on the Accreditation Steering Team. The Board of Trustees accepted the interim accreditation report on December 13, 1994, and approved the midterm accreditation report on October 24, 1995.10 Through the leadership of the Superintendent/President and the Vice President of Student Learning, the Board of Trustees was informed of the accreditation process through periodic reports at regular Board meetings. The Board of Trustees also was informed of accreditation activities through attendance at the following Flex Day activities: September 2, 1997; January 6, 1998; and August 11, 1998.11 In addition, some members of the Board obtained valuable information at the Accreditation Commission workshop that was held on September 26, 1997, at Victor Valley College. On May 12, 1998, Dr. Bettye Underhill, the Board president, participated in a campus open forum to obtain input for the Accreditation Self Study Report. The Board of Trustees also received draft copies of the Accreditation Self Study Report and were able to recommend changes to the document.

 

Planning Agenda

None.

 

 

  1. Institutional Administration and Governance.

 

B1 The institutional chief executive officer provides effective leadership to define goals, develop plans, and establish priorities for the institution.

 

Descriptive Summary

The Superintendent/President sets the tone in which the College conducts its activities in order to fulfill its missions. The Superintendent/President has established a comprehensive approach to long range planning, communications, and daily operation. Through participation in the President�s Cabinet, the Superintendent/President has been actively involved in the formation of the Strategic Plan,1 Educational Master Plan,2 Facilities Plan,12 and Telecommunications Technology Plans,13 which collectively communicate the vision and direction of the College.

The Superintendent/President has also authorized surveys to measure perceptions of personnel concerning the college climate and to measure intra-campus communications. The Superintendent/President has regular monthly or bi-monthly meetings for effective dissemination and discussions of goals and objectives to the Board of Trustees, President�s Cabinet, Leadership Team, the Faculty Senate President and Vice President, the CTA President and Vice President, the CSEA President, and the ASB President and Advisor. In addition, monthly town hall meetings are provided for faculty, administrators and classified staff. The Superintendent/President has also established monthly department chair meetings which are highly attended. In addition, the Superintendent/President personally walks about the campus in order to be visible and accessible to staff.

The Superintendent/President also meets with many community leaders to determine their concerns and help establish priorities for the institution.

 

Self-Evaluation

Under the leadership of the Superintendent/President, the goals, plans and priorities of Victor Valley Community College as delineated in the Strategic Plan1 and the Educational Master Plan2 are closely followed and achieved.

The February, 1998 Personal Assessment of the College Environment (PACE)14 survey conducted by the National Initiative for Leadership and Institutional Effectiveness adds further evidence that the Superintendent/President has effectively provided leadership to the College. This survey was designed to obtain the perceptions of personnel concerning the college climate and to promote more open and constructive communication among faculty, staff, and administrators. The survey results gathered from the responses of full-time and adjunct faculty, classified personnel, and management/administrative personnel indicate that the College possesses "a healthy campus climate," with a mean score of 3.52 out of a possible high of 4.0. The Technical/Campus Operations personnel have the lowest perception of the college environment with a mean score of 3.14, while the Administrative personnel held the most positive perception with a mean score of 3.78. However, only 12.7% of the Technical/Campus Operations personnel employed by the campus responded to the survey making data specific to this subgroup less accurate. The mean scores for the communication evaluation were 3.24 which put the College in the consultative range. This result is consistent with results obtained from other community colleges.

The National Initiative for Leadership and Institutional Effectiveness also administered the Student Assessment of the College Environment survey (SACE)15 in February 1998 for the College. The results of this survey lend further evidence that the Superintendent/President has provided effective leadership for the College. Survey results from the 8.1% of the student body surveyed indicate a mean of 3.71 for the overall environment of the College. Because the mean score of 3.71 was well into the high consultative range, it is evident that the Superintendent/President has created an environment in which student needs are satisfied.

Effective leadership by the Superintendent/President is exercised through the active participation of the Superintendent/President on several committees and with departments designed to facilitate open communication between the office of Superintendent/President and the following constituencies: the President�s Council, Leadership Team meetings, classified employee groups such as Maintenance and Operations, Student Services, and the Library. For example, the Superintendent/President, after consultation with the Vice Presidents and Faculty Senate, determined there was a need for more full-time faculty positions in order to meet projected enrollment needs. Accordingly, the Superintendent/President implemented a process from faculty prioritization which has resulted in the hiring of 16 new full-time faculty within the last two years.

In addition, the Superintendent/President has converted several part-time hourly positions to full-time classified positions to provide perceived support needs and comply with the law.

One example of the Superintendent/President�s successful attention to long range planning is the present high state of the college�s digital infrastructure. Approximately 95 % of campus personnel have direct web access and assistance from several technological individuals. At the present time there are a number of courses being taught on-line, instructors are given 20% release time/ semester to develop this curriculum, and more instructors are beginning to explore this vehicle. Additionally, the College was the host institute for an area wide technology grant planning conference for several community colleges, and several instructors attended.

Another example of effective leadership from the Superintendent/President is the College�s present academic association with the Jerry Lewis Research Center24 at the Vista Campana charter middle school. Through this association, the College will instruct selected students and the Lewis Center will monitor their educational and employment progress.

 

Planning Agenda

1. The College will conduct Personal Assessment of the College Environment (PACE) and Student Assessment of the College Environment (SACE) surveys to increase the percentage of responses.

 

B2 The institutional chief executive officer efficiently manages resources, implements priorities controlling budget and expenditures, and ensures the implementation of statues, regulations, and board policies.

 

Descriptive Summary

The Superintendent/President efficiently manages the resources of the College through several budget processes. The major process of resource allocation is initiated by faculty and classified budget requests. These requests are prioritized by the President�s Cabinet in accordance with the goals and needs of the College. The prioritization system consists of 1) for immediate fulfillment, 2) for fulfillment, and 3) not to be fulfilled. Subsequently, the general budget is presented first to College Assembly and then to the Board of Trustees for discussion and ratification. A parallel process of resource allocation occurs through the Program Review process of individual departments. This process often strengthens budget requests or demonstrates new needs. Under the leadership of the Superintendent/President, the Vice Presidents have formulated long range planning for the College�s infrastructure and programs and student support services.

The President/Superintendent works closely with Human Resources and includes the Director in many committees to ensure the implementation of statutes, regulations and Board of Trustees policies. To strengthen compliance, the Superintendent/President established as a priority the hiring of an Internal Auditor to make estimations and recommendations on how to better comply with state and federal guidelines and policies. This priority was filled in August 1998 when a new Internal Auditor was selected for the College.

The Superintendent/President communicates weekly with the appropriate constituents of the College to manage, allocate, and implement budgetary resources, as well as implement Board of Trustees policies. Categorical technology funds have been wisely utilized to help implement intra-campus communication through e-mail and to help implement on-line curriculum.

 

Self Evaluation

Although faculty and classified submit budgets they have not recently been involved in prioritizing resources. At the present time, this does not seem to be much of a problem.

Because of the visionary leadership of the Superintendent/President and his ability to efficiently manage resources, the College's infrastructure has been dramatically enhanced. The College has three new buildings and an elevator connecting the lower and upper campuses. The new buildings are:

  • The Library
  • Science Building
  • Student Services Center

The old Library has been remodeled and serves as The Academic Commons for student tutorial services, assessment testing, and Learning Disabled aide and counseling. At the present time the Superintendent/President is negotiating with the Chancellor's office for a new technology building heavily equipped with computer terminals to house the Business Education Technology, Computer Information Systems, and Art departments.

The Superintendent/President's visionary leadership, ability to efficiently manage resources, and ability to ensure the implementation of present and future statutes and regulations is demonstrated by several categorical programs. These include:

 

  • The One Stop Career Center
  • Partnership in Excellence program
  • CalWORKS
  • The Student Support Services Program

The implementation of these programs were decided with appropriate constituent groups and with the Faculty Senate.

Prior to the present Superintendent/President�s term, the College experienced a budget deficit. Subsequently, the Superintendent/President and the Board of Trustees jointly determined a need to balance the budget and maintain a budget surplus of 5% as a prerequisite to the successful implementation of any plan. Accordingly, the Superintendent/President implemented policies which met the Board of Trustees directive by the 1997-1998 school year.

As a result of the respect the community has for the College and for the Superintendent/President�s efficient management of resources, the College has received several contributions from the community. An example is the one-million dollars the Foundation has raised through the community for the College.

 

Planning Agenda

1. The College will implement a campus-wide follow-up evaluation process to determine if allocated resources are achieving the appropriate goals.

 

B3 The institution is administratively organized and staffed to reflect the institution�s purposes, size, and complexity. The administration provides effective and efficient leadership and management which makes possible an effective teaching and learning environment.

 

Descriptive Summary

The administrative consist of four levels, including the Superintendent/ President, Vice Presidents, Deans and Directors. In the past several years the institution has undergone many reorganizations. The number of Vice Presidents has been reduced from four to two, and the number of Deans from five to three. The frequent transitions have resulted in changes of position names, duties, and occupants. The organizational structure remains fluid and responsive to change.

The institution is administratively organized and staffed to reflect the institution�s purposes, size, and complexity. The administration provides effective and efficient leadership and management which makes possible an effective teaching and learning environment. The changes in administrative structure and staff attrition since the previous accreditation are discussed in this section. The administrative organizational structure and relationships are depicted on the Victor Valley College Organizational Chart.16

Dr. Gould, the previous Superintendent/President, came to the College in 1990. Dr. Gould left to assume the presidency at Monterey Peninsula College in 1995, and is currently the Vice Chancellor of Student Services at the Chancellor�s Office. The Board of Trustees appointed the 1995 Vice President of Student Services, Nick Halisky, Interim Superintendent/President in June 1995. In November 1995, he assumed the Superintendent/President position. Halisky joined the College in 1972 and has served as the Director of PREP Program, Assistant Dean of Instruction, Dean of Instruction, Interim Vice President of Instruction, Interim Dean of Student Services, Dean of Continuing and Adult Education, Dean of Economic Development, Vice President of Economic Development, Vice President of Student Services, Interim Superintendent/President, and Superintendent/President.

The Vice President of Student Learning, Robert Saltarelli, assumed this position in 1992 and has the overall responsibility for Instruction and Student Services. The Vice President of Institutional Infrastructure, Dr. Jim Pell, assumed this position in August 1992 and is responsible for Auxiliary Services, Fiscal Services/Financial Aid, Maintenance & Operations, Management Information Systems, Performing Arts Center, Print Shop, and Purchasing.

The Dean of Academic Programs, Jeanine Lussier, assumed this position in July 1998 and is responsible for all Academic Programs. The Interim Dean, Student Services, Lou Leo, assumed this position in July 1998 and is responsible for Student Services.

The Dean of Vocational Programs, Tom Clark, assumed this position in August 1998 and is responsible for the administration and coordination of Adult Education, Vocational Programs, Contract Education, Cooperative Education, and Workforce Development.

Since the last Accreditation site visit, the position of Director Customer Relations was created to improve relations with the community. In addition, an Internal Auditor was created to develop, plan, organize, and direct the district-wide internal audit program. To address technology issues, a Director of Institutional Technology was hired in December of 1998.

 

Self Evaluation

The overall results from the Personal Assessment of the College Environment (PACE) instruments indicate that the College, in the organizational structure category provides effective and efficient leadership and management a healthy campus climate, yielding a 3.52 mean score or mid-range consultative system. The administrative personnel held the most positive perception, yielding a mean of 3.78. The Technical/ Campus Operations personnel held the lowest perception, yielding a 3.14 mean score of the college environment. The Work Design/ Technology category received the highest mean score (3.74), whereas the Communication category received the lowest mean score (3.24).

Specifically, the organizational area of the College may be a concern, as indicated by the combined mean score of 2.82 for the Organizational Structure Climate Area. Survey results indicate that the administrative personnel surveyed provided a 3.29 mean regarding this issue, while surveyed administrative support personnel provided a 2.89. In addition surveyed, faculty, and technical/operational personnel provided mean scores of 3.16 and 2.27 respectively regarding the organizational structure of the College. To address this issue, the College has empowered the department chairs to coordinate their own departmental programs, and manage the budget of their department. Since the last site visit, the College has created or reclassified the following new positions: Internal Auditor, Director of Customer Relations, Director of Purchasing/Facility, Director of Financial Aid, Director of Campus Security, and Director of EOPS.

However, the Personal Assessment of the College Environment names the Formal Influence Climate Area as an area of excellence for the College, with a mean score of 4.08 given in response to the question worded as follows: "The extent to which I am given the opportunity to be creative in my work." A score of 4.06 was given in response to the question "the extent to which my manager expresses confidence in my work" which contributed to the high marks received by the College in the Formal Influence Category.

 

Planning Agenda

1. The College will review the administrative structure to determine if the College is appropriately organized and staffed to reflect the institution�s purposes, size, and complexity.

 

B4 Administrative officers are qualified by training and experience to perform their responsibilities and are evaluated systematically and regularly. The duties and responsibilities of institutional administrators are clearly defined and published.

 

Descriptive Summary

Training and experience requirements for each administrative officer are published prior to the recruitment for each position. Only qualified candidates are permitted to compete for the position.

All administrative officers are evaluated annually using published evaluation tools and incorporating input from the entire college community.

The duties and responsibilities of institutional officers are clearly defined and published.

 

Self Evaluation

The duties and responsibilities of the administrative officers are published and updated periodically to reflect the needs of the institution and the changes in the organizational structure. The evaluation process is used to strengthen the performance of the administrative officers and to ensure that the needs of the institution are being met.

According to the Director of Human Resources, a strength of the administrative hiring process is the representation and the active participation of committee members from the different campus groups in the hiring process. The Management Hiring Procedures are delineated in the Faculty and Staff Diversity Plan17 which was approved by the Board of Trustees on September 13, 1994.

Although the evaluation process has been used to strengthen the performance of the administrative officers and to ensure that the needs of the institution are being met, the District is reviewing a new evaluation procedure to be used in 1999/2000 school year.

According to the February 1998 Personal Assessment for the College Environment survey the administration feels that they have received adequate training for their job responsibilities (4.37 mean) and feel competent to perform their job. Ongoing training is needed to keep abreast of leadership strategies and changing technology. In 1998/1999 school year, the College joined a new Administrative Training Consortium, Southern California Community College Districts Employment Relations Consortium, to train administrators in preparing for current statewide issues/changes and to update supervisory skills. In addition administrators attend local, state, and national conferences to keep abreast of current administrative leadership practices.

 

Planning Agenda

1. The current evaluation process for administrators will be rewritten for clarity.

 

B5 Administration has a substantive and clearly-defined role in institutional governance.

 

Descriptive Summary

The role of administration in governance is substantive and clearly defined in the Victor Valley College Governance document.4 The centerpiece for the formal shared governance process is the College Assembly. The purpose of the College Assembly is to share the responsibilities of governance and to involve administrators, management, faculty, staff, and students appropriately in the policy formulation of the College. The College Assembly is made up of two representatives from each of these constituencies. The members of the College Assembly are responsible for communicating information regarding concerns and issues to their groups. The Vice President of Student Learning and Dean of Vocational Programs are the two Administration representatives to the College Assembly. The Director of Facilities Construction and Contracts, and the Director of Auxiliary Services are the two management representatives to the College Assembly. The ultimate result of shared governance is to create an exceptional teaching and learning atmosphere that encourages teaching and learning excellence.

Administrative employees are included on governance committees which formulate policies and procedures that have a significant impact on administrative employees, the Board of Trustees, and the overall operation of the District. Because administrators are held accountable for their actions and decisions, governance committees are advisory. Administrators are obligated to seriously consider input and advice of committee members.

 

Self Evaluation

Based upon interviews with the administration and management representatives of the College Assembly, one of the strengths of the College Assembly is the broad representation and the interaction of the five major constituent groups, faculty, staff, management, administrators and students. The College Assembly recommended the elimination of the Policies and Procedures Committee. The structure of the College Assembly assumed the combining of the Strategy Development Team and the College Assembly into one. According to the administrative representatives, this resulted in overall improvement in communication, greater and consistent attendance, and the elimination of duplicate meetings.

According to the College Assembly Survey (March, 1994),18 there was a need to improve communications between the College Assembly representatives and their respective constituent groups. Communication has been enhanced through receipt of minutes through e-mail, and individual follow-up on issues by the administrative representatives. One of the administrative representatives indicated there is still a need to communicate and confer on shared governance issues with each representatives� constituents to accurately represent the concerns of the representatives� constituents at the College Assembly.

In an analysis of committee participation, administrators and management staff participate in many committees. Some of these committees include, but are not limited to, the following: Accreditation, Amenities Committee, Calendar Committee, Employee Benefits Committee, Affirmative Action Committee, Commencement Committee, Curriculum Committee, Ethics Committee, Facilities Planning Committee, Financial Aid Petitions Committee, Hall of Fame Committee, Matriculation Committee, Staff Diversity Committee, Staff Development Committee, Scholarship Committee, Upward Mobility Committee, and the VATEA/CalWORKS Committee.

 

Planning Agenda

1. The College Assembly will encourage attendance and participation and involve all representatives in the participatory shared governance process.

 

Self Evaluation

 

B6 Faculty have a substantive and clearly-defined role in institutional governance, exercise a substantial voice in matters of educational program and faculty personnel, and other institutional policies which relate to their areas of responsibility and expertise.

 

Descriptive Summary

Faculty have a substantive role in formal and informal governance processes of the institution. The Board of Trustees has adopted policy 2390 regarding the faculty role in collegial governance. The document VICTOR VALLEY COLLEGE GOVERNANCE4 (3/4/97) outlines the governance structure of the college.

This document addresses ten of the eleven academic and professional matters as outlined in Title 5, Section 53200. The governance committee structure and the issues for participation are identified in the document. Specifically in the areas of educational programs and faculty personnel faculty a substantial voice.

 

Self Evaluation

The District relies primarily on the input of faculty in most matters related to academic and professional matters. The faculty and district are able to mutually agree on most other matters related to governance through the various senate committees, college-wide committees, advisory and student committees. There is no formal agreement between the senate and the Board of Trustees regarding the faculty collegial consultation process, nor is there a formal agreement on matters where the senate has primacy or mutual agreement is to be used. Individual input, department input, etc is often mistaken by administration for faculty senate input. Despite the absence of the agreements mentioned above, faculty has a substantive role in governance although not always clearly defined. The current governance committee structure allows constituent group representatives to make decisions on matters that do not impact their particular group.

 

Planning Agenda

1. The Board of Trustees must adopt procedures identifying how it will consult collegially in the eleven areas. The procedures shall include either to "rely primarily upon the advice and judgement of the academic senate" or to "reach mutual agreement."

2. Constituent group representatives must not be allowed to make decisions on matters that do not affect their constituents.

 

B7 Faculty have established an academic senate or other appropriate organization for providing input regarding institutional governance. In the case of private colleges, the institution has a formal process for providing input regarding institutional governance.

 

Descriptive Summary

The Victor Valley College Faculty Senate is recognized by the district as the official voice of the faculty for input on governance matters. The executive board of the Academic Senate is a faculty elected body that serves a two-year term. The five executive officers are directed by a faculty representative structure consisting of twelve elected representatives. The senate president in consultation with the executive board recommends faculty appointments to college committees and the representatives approve the appointments. The committee appointees are responsible for reporting committee activities back to the senate.

 

Self Evaluation

The senate has a committee structure that serves as the vehicle to carry faculty input to the executive officers and area representatives. The senate president and vice president meet with the president bimonthly, two senate representatives sit on the College Assembly, and the senate is recognized at monthly board meetings to give faculty input on academic and professional matters. Occasionally individual input, department input, non-senate committee input, etc. is believed to be the official input of the senate. The senate and administration must verify what committee or constituent group faculty is representing when they are giving input.

 

Planning Agenda

1. Official faculty input must come from the Faculty Senate. Sources for input from faculty other than the Senate must be stated for clarity.

 

B8 The institution has written policy which identifies appropriate institutional support for faculty participation in governance and delineates the participation of faculty on appropriate policy, planning, and special purpose bodies.

 

Descriptive Summary

The document titled Victor Valley College GOVERNANCE4 outlines the institutional philosophy, responsibilities, formal and informal participation of faculty and other constituents having governance responsibilities. The document does not delineate the participation of faculty on planning, policy, and special purpose committees. The College Assembly Committee composition and responsibilities are described. The document does say that faculty are to participate on governance committees which formulate policies, procedures, and standards that have a significant impact on faculty. Eight of the eleven areas identified in Title V, Section 53200 as academic and professional matters are part of the document. The College Assembly may write policy and procedure and they review policy, procedure and recommendations before going to the Board of Trustees. Committees may have a statement of purpose, composition, etc. that is included in the Faculty Senate or Association bylaws or other institutional documents. Faculty participation in institutional planning occurs through the activities such as program review, budget planning and educational master planning. There is no specific formal agreement or written policy delineating faculty participation in the eleven areas identified in Title V, section 53200 and policy, planning, and special purpose bodies.

 

Self Evaluation

The Victor Valley College Governance document partially outlines the role of faculty relating to academic and professional matters. The College Assembly provides faculty and other constituent groups the opportunity to develop and revise institutional policy and procedures. Faculty participation related to planning occurs primarily through departmental and division planning activities. Faculty participation on special purpose bodies is accomplished by soliciting faculty volunteers through a request made to the Academic Senate. Faculty has a substantive role in their participation in institutional governance without a formal agreement.

 

Planning Agenda

1. Review and revise the Victor Valley College Governance document on a regular schedule and include missing elements such as faculty participation on appropriate policy, planning, and special purpose committees.

 

B9 The institution clearly states and publicizes the role of staff in institutional governance.

 

Descriptive Summary

The role of classified staff is specified in the VVC Shared Governance document. Employees on campus indicated they were aware of AB1725. There appears to be concern among staff that the information is not readily available.

 

Self Evaluation

The classified staff at Victor Valley College is committed to serving on the various institutional governance committees that effect classified. The District supports the classified role in institutional governance by giving release time for staff to participate in committee activities.

The Shared Governance policy outlines classified participation on specific committees. However, it is not clear who appointed the classified representative, or who the specific committee members are. Also, two classified committees listed as non-bargaining matters are committees that were negotiated and are a part of the contract language; i.e., grievance and upward mobility.

Committee members have not always been appointed by CSEA. The Shared Governance policy specifically states that appointments from the constituencies for classified are appointed by CSEA and states for on going representation and staggering of terms.

Job Evaluation Advisory Group (JEAG) Committee has representation not appointed by current CSEA Executive Committee. CSEA has requested and submitted a proposal at the negotiation table to replace the existing representation on the JEAG committee. However, the District would not agree to replace the committee members unless the list of participants were mutually agreed upon. This has caused some major disruption in regards to the relationship between classified staff and the District. In November, 1998, an agreement was reached at the negotiation table to disband the JEAG Committee and to negotiate a reclassification procedure.

Staff development and flex day activities need to focus more on classified staff. The concern among classified employees is that money for external Staff Development programs are encumbered early in the year by faculty and management personnel. Due to scheduling of conferences and workshops, classified staff are not aware of programs early enough in the fiscal year to encumber money for the events. Consequently when classified staff request money there generally is no money available. Internal staff development programs are difficult for classified staff to attend because it is necessary for each department to ensure coverage of their specific area.

 

Planing Agenda

1. A list of all committees and committee members will be updated and available on the GroupWise program and the VVC Web Page for community access.

2. The District will implement a plan to insure that all classified staff have opportunity to participate in staff development workshops.

3. Staff development funds will be budgeted to meet the needs of the classified staff.

4. The Shared Governance document will be disseminated campus wide.

 

B10 The institution clearly states and publicizes the role of students in institutional governance.

 

Descriptive Summary

The Victor Valley College Associated Student Body (ASB) has well-defined responsibilities and functions which are described in the ASB Constitution and Bylaws.19 The ASB Council is elected annually and consists of 15 students (President, Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer and 11 senators). The ASB offices are located on the second floor of the Student Activities Center. The Director of Auxiliary Services advises the ASB and helps coordinate student activities.

Copies of the ASB Constitution and Bylaws, Club Charter Packets and ASB Agendas and Minutes are readily accessible in the ASB office. Agendas are publicized in accordance with the Brown Act, at least 72 hours in advance, and are open to the public.

The major functions of the ASB are to participate in college governance, sponsor campus activities (including student organizations), increase supportive roles in college services and promote educational, cultural and social activities. The ASB budget for 1998-9920 totals $100,000, which is derived primarily from the sale of ASB Cards as well as revenues from Athletic and Theatre Arts ticket sales.

Students participate in the governance of Victor Valley College through the ASB, representation on various college committees, and through a student trustee (ASB President) on the Board of Trustees. Students are appointed by ASB to serve on college committees, including the Faculty Senate and College Assembly as well as the Graduation, Policy and Procedures, Curriculum, Budget, Diversity, Accreditation, and Affirmative Action Committees. AB1725 has strengthened the role of students in the governance process. Students are participating in the implementation of the shared governance structure.

ASB is increasing the communication on campus through the RamPage,21 ASB Newsletter, professionally designed posters, and the sponsoring new student orientations (i.e. Nursing, EOPS).

 

Self Evaluation

ASB is an active force on campus and is increasing its supportive roles to bring the students, the college and the community together in order to promote educational, cultural and social activities.

ASB has sponsored and co-sponsored many campus activities such as Rams Day, Tech Fare, AIDS Awareness Week, Red Ribbon Week, Student Health Seminars, and packaged/delivered Thanksgiving and Christmas baskets to needy students.

ASB initiated the opening of a computer word processing and Internet lab and continues to provide services that are of value to students as well as ASB cardholders.

ASB established a mission statement22 and an obtainable list of Goals and Objectives for Fiscal Year 98-9923 at the annual ASB Retreat. ASB members and key campus decision-makers attended the retreat: President of the Board of Trustees, Academic Deans, Vice President, and Director Fiscal Services. The goals and objectives, written as action statements, were in response to student concerns about vital campus issues and will be addressed during the Fiscal Year 98-99. ASB has insured that these issues be addressed in forums that will be heard, understood and acted upon (i.e. Board of Trustee meeting, Faculty Senate, College Assembly, Department Chair Meeting).

ASB is increasing the value associated with the ASB card, thereby increasing the number of cards sold, through partnerships with the Rams Bookstore, EOPS Department and local businesses. Adding value to the ASB Card, by raising parking fees for non-ASB card holders, creating computer labs for card holders and offering discounts in the Rams Bookstore for card holders may help accomplish this.

ASB has taken on the task of providing campus identifications to the Faculty, Staff, nursing students, respiratory therapy students and Child Care Center Employees in addition to the ASB Cardholders, thereby insuring personal contact with a larger percentage of the campus community.

 

Planning Agenda

1. Improve the identity of the ASB through increased participation in orientations, department chair meetings and other committees that affect the educational environment.

2. Improve the identity of the ASB by increasing the number of ASB Cards sold, thereby insuring that all students have an identification card.

3. Create obtainable goals that ASB can advertise to students as success stories. An example for 98-99 is the installation of emergency phones in the parking lots.

 

Standard Ten Documents Cited:

  1. Strategic Plan
  2. Educational Master Plan
  3. Fall 1998 E-Mail Survey of faculty, classified staff, manager, and administrators.
  4. Shared Governance Document
  5. Board Policy Handbook
  6. Board Policy 9050, Code of Ethics
  7. December 2, 1998, Board of Trustees Workshop
  8. Board policy for selection of Superintendent/President
  9. 1997-98 survey of Superintendent/President Halisky
  10. Accreditation reports, Board minutes
  11. Flex Day agenda
  12. Facilities Plan
  13. Telecommunications Technology Plan
  14. Personal Assessment of the College Environment Survey
  15. Student Assessment of the College Environment Survey
  16. VVC Organizational Chart
  17. Faculty and Staff Diversity Plan
  18. March 1994 College Assembly Survey
  19. ASB Constitution and Bylaws
  20. ASB Approved Budget, 1998-99
  21. ASB Newsletter, RamPage
  22. ASB Mission Statement
  23. ASB Goals and Objectives, 1998-99
  24. Lewis Research Center