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Definitions

  1. DOMESTIC VIOLENCE is defined as abuse committed against an adult or a minor who is a spouse or former spouse, cohabitant or former cohabitant, or someone with whom the abuser has a child, has an existing dating or engagement relationship, or has had a former dating or engagement relationship.
  2. DATING VIOLENCE is defined as abuse committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim.
  3. STALKING is behavior in which a person repeatedly engages in conduct directed at a specific person that places that person in reasonable fear for his or her safety, the safety of others or substantial emotional distress.
  4. SEXUAL HARASSMENT is defined as unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors and other verbal, nonverbal, or physical conduct of a sexual nature. Sexual harassment is conduct that explicitly or implicitly affects a person’s employment or education or interferes with a person’s work or educational performance or creates an environment such that a reasonable person would find the conduct intimidating, hostile, or offensive. Sexual harassment includes sexual violence (see definition below). Victor Valley College will respond to reports of any such conduct in accordance with District Policy on Sexual Harassment.
    • Unwanted sexual misconduct which may lead to a complaint of sexual harassment:
      • Electronically recording, photographing, or transmitting intimate or sexual utterances, sounds or images of another person
      • Falsifying a posting on an electronic site involving sex or sexual activity
  5. SEXUAL ASSAULTS
    • Rape is an act of sexual intercourse accomplished against a person’s will by means of force, violence, duress, menace or fear. Also, where a person is prevented from resisting by any intoxicating or controlled substances or when a person is unconscious.
    • Sexual battery is unsolicited and unwanted touching of an intimate part (sexual organ, anus, groin, buttocks, and breast of a female) or another person’s body. This includes situations where the victim is unable to resist due to alcohol or drug use
    • Forcible sodomy is oral or anal sexual intercourse with another person, by force or fear, and against their will. Also when the person is incapable of giving consent because of age or mental or physical incapacity
    • Sexual assault with an object is the use of an object or instrument to unlawfully penetrate, however slight, the genital or anal opening of another person, forcibly and against their will or where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her youth or temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity
  6. CONSENT
    • Consent is informed.  Consent is an affirmative, unambiguous, and conscious decision by each participant to engage in mutually agreed-upon sexual activity
    • Consent is voluntary. It must be given without coercion, force, threats, or intimidation. Consent means positive cooperation in the act or expression of intent to engage in the act pursuant to an exercise of free will
    • Consent is revocable. Consent to some form of sexual activity does not imply consent to other forms of sexual activity. Consent to sexual activity on one occasion is not consent to engage in sexual activity on another occasion.  A current or previous dating or sexual relationship, by itself, is not sufficient to constitute consent. Even in the context of a relationship, there must be mutual consent to engage in sexual activity. Consent must be ongoing throughout a sexual encounter and can be revoked at any time. Once consent is withdrawn, the sexual activity must stop immediately
    • Consent cannot be given when a person is incapacitated. A person cannot consent if s/he is unconscious or coming in and out of consciousness. A person cannot consent if s/he is under the threat of violence, bodily injury or other forms of coercion. A person cannot consent if his/her understanding of the act is affected by a physical or mental impalement 

 

Last Updated 8/19/16